Discover how to take beautiful portraits that take back light from the window

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Back lighting from windows should be used for indoor portraits. You can brighten and soften the texture of your photos by creating light with a reflective sheet while applying positive exposure compensation. In the following, I will provide a step-by-step guide, illustrating the various effects of Discover how to take beautiful portraits that take back light from the window.

EOS 5D Mark III / EF50mm f / 1.8 STM / FL: 50mm / Manual exposure (f / 2.8 / 1/80 sec) / ISO 200 / WB: Auto / FL: 50mm (equivalent to 35mm in 35mm format)
Accessories used: tripod and reflective sheet

Step 1: Find a soft light source

EOS 5D Mark III / EF50mm f / 1.8 STM / FL: 50mm / Manual exposure (f / 2.8, 1/125 sec) / ISO 200 / WB: Auto
The accessories used: tripod

The contrast between light and dark areas becomes stronger when the backlight is too strong. In this example, I used back light on a cloudy day, which is an easy and effective condition to create a smooth pattern.

Step 2: Brighten the portrait subject with back light reflected from below

EOS 5D Mark III / EF50mm f / 1.8 STM / FL: 50mm / Manual exposure (f / 2.8, 1/125 sec) / ISO 200 / WB: Auto
Accessories used: tripod and reflective sheet

When using back light to take pictures, it creates a dark background as illustrated in Step 1. To avoid this problem, the first step is to reflect the backlight from below using a reflective plate without adjustment. exposure value. Reflecting the backlight not only helps to brighten the subject, but it also adds a soft feel and brings out skin tones.

Step 3: Brighten the image with positive exposure compensation

EOS 5D Mark III / EF50mm f / 1.8 STM / FL: 50mm / Manual exposure (f / 2.8, 1/60 sec) / ISO 200 / WB: Auto
Accessories used: tripod and reflective sheet

Next, apply positive exposure compensation to brighten the image. Here, it is important to follow the steps of using a reflector first, then adding positive exposure compensation to fine-tune the brightness when light from the reflector alone is not enough. Adjust the amount of exposure compensation and check the image on the camera at the same time.

Step 4: Adjust the angle to add depth to the composition

EOS 5D Mark III / EF50mm f / 1.8 STM / FL: 50mm / Manual exposure (f / 2.8 / 1/80 sec) / ISO 200 / WB: Auto / 50mm (equivalent to 35mm in 35mm format)
Accessories used: tripod and reflective sheet

Step 3 illustrates photos taken from right in front of the subject. In Step 4, I adjusted a little bit of the position to add some fun to the composition. Doing so adds depth to the background. Also, I created a space on the left side of the composition and emphasized it with a phone.

Notice the balance between light and dark

Backlight from the window is useful for scenes in which you want to capture portrait subjects with a soft ambience. However, resolving the backlight can be a difficult task. The examples above were taken on a cloudy day, and it is easier to handle back light than on a clear day when there is strong sunlight, which causes the background to become bright and appear limp. light and dark details, making it difficult to bring out the skin tones of a portrait subject.

If you have this problem, try reducing the difference between light and dark areas and adding light to dark areas with a reflector board. An alternative is to fire a weak flash. But another method is to place the camera at an angle from above or from the side to eliminate unwanted light. It is not possible to reproduce the fine texture of a portrait subject in the foreground simply by applying positive exposure compensation. An important consideration when photographing is to ensure that the embossing and texture of the skin tone are noticeable in the image.

>>> Discover more interesting sharing of Hoi An Photographer on how to take photos and edit photos to create the most unique photos.

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